The International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology (ISHPSSB) brings together scholars from diverse disciplines, including the life sciences as well as history, philosophy, and social studies of science. The biennial ISHPSSB summer meetings are known for innovative, transdisciplinary sessions, and for fostering informal, co-operative exchanges and on-going collaborations.

Including: Message from the President, info on ISHPSSB2017 São Paolo, news from the Committees, and a call for support from the Central European University (Hungary) and the Centro Lombardo (Mexico).

President's Corner

A large part of this Newsletter is devoted to preparations for the São Paulo meeting. I want to thank Maria Elice de Brzezinski Prestes, Jessica Bolker, Charbel El-Hani, and all the members of the Local Organization Committee and of the Program Committee for the excellent work that they have already done. I recommend looking closely at the information given below, and on the meeting website. They will help you to decide if and how to plan your trip to Brazil.

I am optimistic, and convinced that all the conditions are met for the next meeting to be a success, scientifically and extra-scientifically. Particularly, it will allow us to establish or to strengthen relations between research communities that so far have not interacted sufficiently. However, it is each member’s personal decision whether or not to come to São Paulo. To help each of you in your decision, most necessary information has been put on the website.

As most of you already know, and as described in the Program Committee’s contribution to this Newsletter, the call for individual papers and organized sessions has already been made. I would like to emphasize that the preparation of the sessions is a crucially important time in the life of our Society. I warmly recommend that you organize sessions, instead of preparing individual contributions. It is clear to all of us who have already participated in an ISHPSSB meeting that organized sessions tend to have larger attendances. It is an excellent opportunity to make your research known not only to other scholars in your field, but also to scholars of different disciplines, since these organized sessions are often transdisciplinary.

Organized sessions represent more. They exemplify the spirit of our Society, the will to articulate, whenever possible, different points of view on the same issue. The preparation of these organized sessions, the contacts that are established to build them, and the discussions that take place to finalize them, are probably as important as the sessions themselves. This work is the best way to defend and to develop what constitutes the core of our Society, and permits it to find its place in the landscape of other Societies. We cannot compete with many of them in terms of the number of members, nor the place they have in academic institutions. What we can uniquely offer are our efforts to explore new territories and new frontiers, by eventually attracting new members from other disciplines and other countries. To do that, we must create conditions favourable to encounters between new members and old ones, members known to other members of the Society, and those who are not. Some simple rules have in the past been adopted by our Society to favour these objectives, and must not be abandoned: to give equal time for talks to all members of the Society; and not to remunerate the different tasks ISHPSSB members or officers may accomplish for it. Trying to mimic bigger Societies would lead nowhere.

A last call for our future meetings. I fully support Marsha Richmond’s appeal (see below) for hosts of the 2019 and 2021 meetings. To organize future meetings or to build their programs is a huge task. But these efforts are rewarding both personally, because it is an extraordinary opportunity to encounter and get to know plenty of interesting scholars, and frequently also professionally—although we must admit that these efforts are sometimes inadequately acknowledged.

Michel Morange
President

Werner Callebaut Prize 2017: Call for Manuscripts

The International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology seeks submissions for the 2017 Werner Callebaut Prize. This prize is intended to advance the careers of younger scholars working at the intersection of the fields represented by the ISHPSSB, and will be awarded to the best manuscript utilizing an interdisciplinary approach based on a presentation at one of the two previous ISHPSSB meetings (Montpellier or Montréal) by someone who was, at the time of presentation, a graduate student. The prize is named in honor of Werner Callebaut, whose untimely death in 2014 inflicted a serious blow to the Philosophy of Biology community worldwide.

Werner’s mentorship and guidance has benefitted the intellectual and personal development of countless philosophers and scientists over the last twenty years, and contributed greatly to making sure that philosophical and scientific work evolve in constructive dialogue and reciprocal respect. His work reached creatively across fields of relevance to the philosophical understanding of Biology (comprising areas as far removed as Economics, Evolutionary Biology, History, Sociology and Cognitive Science), as well as across national cultures, languages and traditions (most notably the ‘continental-analytic’ divide among philosophers of science), hence making a prize focused on interdisciplinarity most appropriate, especially for the ISHPSSB which explicitly encourages interdisciplinary approaches.

The award will consist of a certificate and an award of $500, as well as a permanent record of the award on a plaque which circulates every two years to the current winner(s). Submissions may be simultaneously considered for the Grene and the Callebaut prizes, but a paper may not be awarded both prizes. Submissions should be in the form of a paper prepared for submission to a professional journal, with an indication of the journal in question, along with a brief statement detailing the interdisciplinarity represented in the manuscript.

An electronic copy (in Microsoft Word or PDF format), together with the required cover sheet (available at this link), should be emailed as one document to the Chair of the Callebaut Prize Committee, Rachel A. Ankeny, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., no later than 15 February 2017. The winning paper will be announced at the 2017 meeting in São Paulo. The committee reserves the right not to make an award, or to split the award. With thanks to the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI) for financial support for the Callebaut Prize.

Additional information about the Callebaut Prize is available at this link.

Marjorie Grene & Werner Callebaut Prize Committee

Marjorie Grene Prize 2017: Call for Manuscripts

The International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology seeks submissions for the 2017 Marjorie Grene Prize. This prize is intended to advance the careers of younger scholars, and will be awarded to the best manuscript based on a presentation at one of the two previous ISHPSSB meetings (Montréal or Montpellier) by someone who was, at the time of presentation, a graduate student. It is very appropriate for the ISHPSSB to name this prize in Marjorie Grene’s honor. Not only does her work in the History and Philosophy of Biology exemplify the strong spirit of interdisciplinary work fundamental to the ISHPSSB, but she played a central role in bringing together diverse scholars of Biology even before the formation of the Society. She has been a valued mentor to many members of the Society and a long-standing inspiration to all. The award will consist of a certificate and an award of $500, as well as a permanent record of the award on a plaque which circulates every two years to the current winner(s). Submissions may be simultaneously considered for the Grene and the Callebaut prizes, but a paper may not be awarded both prizes.

Submissions should be in the form of a paper prepared for submission to a professional journal, with an indication of the journal in question. An electronic copy (in Microsoft Word or PDF format), together with the required cover sheet (available at this link), should be emailed as one document to the Chair of the Grene Prize Committee, Rachel A. Ankeny, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., no later than 15 February 2017. The winning paper will be announced at the 2017 meeting in São Paulo. The committee reserves the right not to make an award, or to split the award.

Additional information about the Grene Prize is available at this link.

Marjorie Grene & Werner Callebaut Prize Committee

David L. Hull Prize 2017: Call for Nominations

The International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology seeks nominations for the 2017 David L. Hull Prize for History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology. The David L. Hull Prize is a biennial prize established in 2011 by the ISHPSSB to honor the life and legacy of David L. Hull (1935-2010). The David L. Hull Prize honors an extraordinary contribution to scholarship and service that promotes interdisciplinary connections between History, Philosophy, Social Studies, and Biology.

A complete nomination package will consist of two letters of nomination each signed by at least one member of the ISHPSSB and a current curriculum vitae of the candidate. Those who made previous nominations are encouraged to resubmit the nominees, if still appropriate. Deadline: 15 January 2017

More details and nomination procedures: http://www.ishpssb.org/prizes/david-l-hull-prize

David Hull Prize Committee

ISHPSSB 2017

The Local Organizing Committee will be happy to welcome you to São Paulo for the next 2017 ISHPSSB meeting, which will be held alongside the 2017 meeting of the Brazilian Association for Philosophy and History of Biology (ABFHiB). The meeting will take place at the Institute of Biosciences, University of São Paulo from July 16 to July 21 and it is jointly organized by the following organizations: ISHPSSB, ABFHiB, University of São Paulo, and Butantan Institute.

We are confident that this meeting will bring together scholars from diverse latitudes, longitudes and disciplines, including the life sciences as well as History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Science. ISHPSSB conferences are known for their innovative and transdisciplinary sessions, as well as for fostering informal, cooperative exchanges and ongoing collaborations.

Recent previous meetings were held in Guelph (2005), Exeter (2007), Brisbane (2009), Salt Lake City (2011), Montpellier (2013), and Montréal (2015), and have attracted up to six hundred participants from all regions of the world. For this 2017 meeting we hope to continue this tradition to bring an informal, collegial approach. We especially seek sessions that embody innovative cross-disciplinary content, format, or both.

Welcome to São Paulo, a vibrant, cosmopolitan city, for the ISHPSSB meeting. We welcome your contributions.

Maria Elice Brzezinski Prestes & Charbel El-Hani
on behalf of the Local Arrangements & Program Committees

ATTENTION

If you are planning to attend to the 2017 ISHPSSB Meeting, please remember to check the Plan Your Trip and Visa information on the meeting website.

Call for Abstracts

The ISHPSSB meetings are known for bringing together scholars in the humanities interacting with the life sciences, notably historians, philosophers, and social scientists, as well as scientists themselves and biological education researchers. The submission of organized sessions and individual papers on any topic within the society’s scope is welcome. We also encourage the submission of posters.

Proposals for open or closed organized sessions and individual papers (talks or posters) should be submitted through the 2017 meeting’s website, at “Submission of Papers” from October 1st, 2016 to January 15th, 2017. Before submitting your proposal, have a look at the open sessions listed at the Conference Board.

We especially encourage organized session submissions and offer rolling acceptances for organized session submissions. This will benefit those of you who would like to plan your ISHPSSB travel early, and will ensure the timely completion of the overall program for the conference. While all session types may be submitted from October 1st, 2016, only organized sessions will benefit from the rolling acceptance policy. The earlier you submit an organized session, the earlier you will hear from us about acceptance, and the more choice you will have as to the scheduling of your session.

Please use the ISHPSSB Conference Board to post ideas for organized sessions and to coordinate with others looking to do so. The purpose of the Conference Board is to provide a forum for pre-conference (or during-conference) discussions for ISHPSSB 2017 in São Paulo, Brazil. You must be an ISHPSSB member to use the Conference Board. Note that you need to sign in and be up-to-date on your membership dues to post or reply.

All submission formats can be checked at “Submission of Papers”.

Remember: Submissions close at 15th January, 2017

As with past meetings, ISHPSSB 2017 aims at facilitating the exchange of research ideas and results across a range of fields, while fostering informal, cooperative exchanges and ongoing collaborations among a variety of international scholars. It is our goal to develop a program that will allow maximal interactions, while also giving people the chance to present their ideas to their colleagues. For this reason, we have a Participation Rule: the simple rule of two. Any individual can appear at most twice on the program (as speaker, commentator, roundtable participant, or poster author) in addition to serving as a session chair.

Overarching Rationales: The submission structure for the ISHPSSB 2017 meeting is aimed at (i) encouraging participants to submit Organized Sessions, and (ii) doing so relatively early on; it also should (iii) facilitate other ISHPSSB desiderata for sessions, such as interdisciplinarity, inter-regionality, and diversity of career stages among the participants. The ISHPSSB has been a great place for interdisciplinary and transnational work, as well as graduate student and junior faculty mentoring. Thus, we encourage session organizers to especially attend to considerations of interdisciplinarity and diversity, both of which are valued by the ISHPSSB community. We particularly encourage geographic, institutional and gender diversity.

Other submission requirements: All submissions will require the completion of a checklist featuring themes and topics that will assist the program chairs in evaluating and scheduling the submission. Please direct any inquiries to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Guidelines to Submit Proposals

l  All submitted sessions will be 90 minutes in length. Please see the submission formats at the paper submission web page for further information about the types of organized sessions, rules governing number of participations in the program, and the rolling acceptance policy for organized sessions.

l  Abstracts must be submitted exclusively via the paper submission web page. Abstracts submitted via email or any other means will not be accepted. Submissions must be written in English. All sessions will be held in English. If you are submitting more than one abstract, please use the same email address and password for each abstract. The email you provide us will be used to notify you of the acceptance and to send you updated information. An organized session is created by the lead organizer for, and the chair of, that session. The lead organizer is responsible for completing all session details, and submitting that session once it is completed. Abstracts are limited to 300 words. A lead organizer/chair can add co-organizers to the session, and 3 (standard) or 2 - 8 (diverse formats) participants in the session. The lead organizer/chair can be, but need not be, a participant in the organized session. When adding participants in the session, the lead organizer/chair must make sure to use a valid email address for each participant. Once saved, this email address cannot be changed by the lead organizer, nor can the personal information of each participant. This personal information can only be changed by the participants themselves, who must also log in with the same email address (and retrieve a password, if they have not chosen any so far, by using the "retrieve password" function).

l  Acknowledgment of your submission will be sent to the email address provided by the first author (individual presentation) or lead organizer (special session). Please make sure that you receive an email confirmation after making your submission. Upon receiving a submitted, confirmed organized session, the program co-chairs will review the session and if it is accepted, schedule the session in the program and inform the lead organizer for the session. A participating paper or presentation in an organized session can have a single or multiple authors.

l  Lead organizers/chairs can be participants in the session, but need not be, and will be given a choice here in entering their information. If an organizer is the lead organizer/chair on multiple sessions, she can be a participant in at most two of these. She can, however, be a co-organizer on further sessions: just not a participant.

l  Please use the ISHPSSB Conference Board to post ideas for organized sessions and to coordinate with others looking to do so. In particular, if you are planning on submitting an individual paper you are encouraged to post ideas, as this provides a good way to find others who are interested in presenting on similar topics. To submit individual papers, follow the instructions on the submission page; if accepted, your paper will be grouped and scheduled by the program committee.

l  If you must withdraw an abstract, please contact the Conference Program Committee via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please note that withdrawals need to be requested by the first author (individual presentation) or the lead organizer (special session) who originally submitted the abstract, who is responsible for ensuring that all other authors are informed of the withdrawal.

l  If the presenting author (individual presentation) or lead organizer (special session) of an accepted abstract does not register by April 30th, 2017, the abstract will be automatically withdrawn from the final program.

Please check the general guidelines and recommendations for the preparation of posters and oral presentations in the ISHPSSB 2017 meeting website.

Further Tips: Do not open a session in two browsers at the same time. If you have problems during a session, try saving and logging back in. It may be that switching browsers will make for easier session entry.

Charbel El-Hani & Jessica Bolker
Co-Chairs of the Program Committee

Please contact us at:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for

      submission- and program-related inquiries

ishpssbThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for

      registration- and payment-related inquiries

      sponsorship inquiries

      invitation letters

      all other inquiries

Site Selection Committee Report: ISHPSSB 2019 & ISHPSSB 2021

The Site Selection Committee has received an expression of interest to host the 2019 meeting. While we are optimistic that a formal proposal will be forthcoming, we nonetheless welcome additional expressions of interest. We are also seeking a site to host the 2021 ISHPSSB meeting. Given the recent geographic balance of our meetings, we would especially encourage solicitations from the United States, but all proposals are welcomed. The committee is always happy to assist in thinking about how to approach organizing a meeting and the process of putting together a proposal.

For further information, contact the chair, Marsha Richmond (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Site Selection Committee

Report on Off-Year ISHPSSB 2016 Workshops

Social and Conceptual Issues in Astrobiology

A very successful ISHPSSB off year workshop was held at Clemson University in September 24-25 (see the workshop’s web page) to explore the social and conceptual issues surrounding the search for life on other planets (Astrobiology). The workshop mixed younger scholars and graduate students with established scholars from a wide variety of disciplines including History, Philosophy, Communications, Biology, Astronomy, Engineering, Theology, Medicine, Chemistry, Geology, and Education. The quality of presentations was excellent and many will appear in a forthcoming conference volume.

This field is sure to attract increasing attention with the explosion of exoplanet discoveries and NASA’s prediction that we will likely find evidence of life beyond Earth within the next 20 years. The organizers plan to leverage the success of the meeting with a second meeting at the University of Nevada, Reno in the Spring of 2018. Our ultimate goal is to found a new society dedicated to scholarship and outreach on these exciting issues and thus we invite anyone interested in learning more to contact Kelly Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kelly Smith (Local Organizer)

Function and Malfunction in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences and Social Sciences

The 4th European Advanced Seminar in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) was devoted to the topic of function and malfunction in Biology, Biomedicine and the Social Sciences and was organized by Jean Gayon, Alvaro Moreno, and Isabella Sarto-Jackson. It took place at the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI) in Klosterneuburg, Austria, at the beginning of September 2016, and gathered together a numerous and very diverse group of early and advanced researchers (from 13 different countries and 3 distinct continents).

The forty participants had the chance to discuss and interact for five days in the tranquil and inspiring atmosphere of the host institute that is perched between the river Danube and the foothills of the Vienna Woods. The format of this workshop included individual presentations, contributions of senior scholars and commentaries of junior researchers, moderated roundtable discussions, and a general discussion session, in which all participants were involved. It was a wonderful opportunity for all participants to get a good perspective on the different problems and views that are being currently discussed regarding the concepts of function and malfunction in the contemporary philosophy of the life sciences. In addition, it allowed young researchers to get acquainted with timely developments in neighboring fields and to network at an early stage of their career.

A report of the workshop is to be written by a small group of participants to be submitted to the journal Biological Theory. Also, a selection of the papers presented in the workshop will get published in a thematic section of the same journal.

We thank ISHPSSB and other organizations that provided support for this meeting and look forward to the 5th EASPLS, which will take place in September 2018 at the KLI and will be directed by Thomas Reydon and Sabina Leonelli.

David Suárez Pascal (Participant) and Isabella Sarto-Jackson (Local Organizer)

Credits

This newsletter was edited by David Suarez Pascal. I thank Maria Kronfeldner, Michel Morange and Sean Valles for all their help, as well as to the ISHPSSB members who contributed with their texts to this newsletter.

President’s Update

Ana Barahona, President

Dear colleagues,

Some important things have happened since I last wrote for the President's Corner.

As you know David Hull passed away on August 11 of this year at the age of 75. He is going to be missed immensely by us all. He was a great leader and an inspiration to our Society in many ways. Not only were his contributions to the field of history, philosophy and social studies of biology enormous, but his kind and warm personality made many of us feel proud of being his students,

colleagues and/or friends. He supported many people throughout his life, and personally, I feel very grateful to have had a supportive friend and colleague.

David Hull is very well known for his contributions to the history, philosophy and social studies of biology, and was one of the founding fathers of ISH. To acknowledge his outstanding career, the Council has received with great happiness a proposal to establish the David L. Hull Prize for History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology, signed by all the Past-Presidents the Society has had. After a brief discussion, the Council approved the motion unanimously, hoping that with this Prize we can keep his memory alive.

As a result of the above mentioned the Council created the Hull Prize

Committee in accordance with the By- Laws. Those included in this committee are the five most recent Past-Presidents, along with other distinguished members of our Society.

I would like to take this opportunity to bring to your attention the fact that the Society is now open for donations. The Past-Presidents have made a significant contribution to the funding of the Prize and I would like to invite all those who feel so inclined to do the same to please contact Lisa Gannett, our treasurer.

The first Hull Prize Medal will be awarded at our next meeting in Utah, July 2011. Please take a look at the Call for Nominations for this Prize below.

Turning to other issues, let me tell you that we had a successful off-year

workshop on “Integrating Complexity: Environment and History” at the University of Western Ontario, Canada. The workshop included researchers from many different fields to address challenging conceptual and methodological questions. According to the organizers “this workshop continued the ISHPSSB off-year tradition of ́future directions in biology studies ́ by placing a bet: whatever their precise direction, such studies will tend to be more and more interdisciplinary”. Please see the extensive report below.

Our next meeting is coming soon. If you are undecided about attending or participating, or about the topic you plan to share, this is the perfect time to make plans for this important future event. You can check the Call for Papers and Posters that is posted on our web page and pasted below. There you will find comments on audience, posters and themes, the deadline for the final call for papers and posters, the policy on multiple participation and the guidelines for submission. We are looking forward to seeing you in Utah!

Finally, please take a look at the Call for proposals to host the 2013 Meeting and the Call for Papers for the Marjorie Grene Prize, also check Lisa Gannett ́s information about the student travel support for Utah 2011. Important as it is, Roberta Millstein invites you to get involved in YOUR Society.

The 2011 ISHPSSB David Hull Prize Competition

ISHPSSB seeks nominations for the 2011 David L. Hull Prize for History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology. As our President, Ana Barahona has just announced, the David L. Hull Prize honors an extraordinary contribution to scholarship and service that promotes interdisciplinary connections between history, philosophy, social studies, and biology. In the spirit of David Hull’s own service to the profession and his support for the contributions the advancement of people at early stages of their careers, the Prize is not restricted to recognition of a lifetime of achievement, but may be awarded to individuals at any stage of their career to acknowledge and promote significant efforts they have made that combine scholarship and service.

It is appropriate to name this prize in honor of David Hull, a former president of our society who set a very high standard of interdisciplinary scholarship in his scholarly work, but also did important leg work to help found the philosophy of biology and worked tirelessly to build bridges among our disciplines. He served as President of three very different societies (ISHPSSB (1991-1992), the Philosophy of Science Association (1985-6), and the Society of Systematic Zoologists (1984-5)), performed a great deal of service for these and a number of other societies, and did a great deal to foster the publication of interesting work in all of our disciplines. Among other things, David served for 21 years as General Editor of the University of Chicago Press Series in the Conceptual Foundations of Science and as a member of about 15 editorial boards of journals and encyclopedias. David was a staunch and proud advocate of gay rights who brought the virtues of advocacy to his professional life. He always sought to help those to whom doors were closed and was especially noteworthy for the many ways in which he assisted people at the beginning their careers, helping them, inter alia, to overcome any barriers put in their way and to improve their publications even when their viewpoints were strongly contrary to his own.

Winners of the David L. Hull Prize will receive a medal in honor of their contributions to scholarship and service. We anticipate that the first medal will be awarded at the 2011 meeting in Salt Lake City.

A complete nomination package will consist of two letters of nomination each signed by at least one member of ISHPSSB and a current curriculum vitae of the candidate. Because of the late announcement this year, the deadline for nominations will be 1 January, 2011; in future we anticipate that the deadline will be 1 July, approximately one year before the next annual meeting of ISHPSSB. The nomination package must be sent to the Chair of the Committee, either by email with attachments (preferred) or by ordinary post. The address to which to send nominations is at the end of this announcement.

The David L. Hull Prize Committee for 2011 consists of:

Richard M. Burian, Chair This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Garland Allen This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Lindley Darden This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Michael Dietrich This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;

Jean Gayon This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jim Griesemer This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

V. Betty Smocovitis This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Michel Morange This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Maria Jesús Santesmases This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Nominations should be mailed to Richard Burian either at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or to:

Richard M. BurianChair, Hull Prize Committee Department of Philosophy - 0126 Virginia TechBlacksburg, VA 24060USA

Call for Papers and Sessions

ISHPSSB Program Co-Chairs Chris Young and Mark Largent hope you are already thinking about papers and sessions for the 2011 meeting in Salt Lake City.

To be sure you are getting the most up-to-date information about the meeting, subscribe to the ISHPSSB listserv by clicking on the “Listserv” link at www.ishpssb.org

ISHPSSB officers have set up a bulletin board where you can suggest a session, or review sessions that have been proposed so far. For now, only members can post on this bulletin board, so you might check on your membership status and then start sharing ideas. The bulletin board link is http://ishpssb.onefireplace.com/

Our expectation for the Salt Lake City meeting is that we will have more cross-disciplinary sessions than ever before. In addition, we expect that all sessions will be geared toward wider audiences. This was a major thrust of the discussions that came out of the Brisbane meeting in 2009. Every scholar has numerous meetings in which to present work to her or his peers: historians speaking to historians, philosophers speaking to philosophers, sociologists speaking to sociologists, and biologists from across the spectrum speaking to biologists within their specialty. ISHPSSB is uniquely situated to provide us the opportunity to talk to each other, across disciplinary boundaries, about biology studies. In order for this to happen, we need to think broadly about each other as an audience. We hope you will begin now to look for ways of collaborating.

A new feature of the program for 2011 will be a poster session. Please view the separate Call for Posters by following the link at: http:// ishpssb.org/meeting.html

Presenters should think about ways their work will potentially connect to other sessions throughout the meeting. We hope this can be accomplished by thinking about the larger themes that are illuminated by your work. These themes are meant to be broad and overlapping, but will help to provide benchmarks for organizing sessions as well as signposts for people at the conference seeking out areas of inquiry. Some themes we have identified include: Civic engagement; Race; Policy, science funding, and scientific progress; Sustainability, environment, energy, and economics; Gender and LGBT; Genetic testing; Evo- Devo; and Education. Details about several of these themes can be found on the bulletin board, and more will be posted as we move forward. Please note that not all papers and sessions are expected to fit into one of the themes, and we hope that as we see work that pushes beyond these categories we can all be more aware of the new directions scholars and members of ISHPSSB are taking.

Of course, we welcome sessions in all areas of our fields; individual paper submissions are also welcome. The basic time unit for sessions will be 90 minutes. As soon as the registration pages are up and running, you may submit a freestanding paper proposal. This should happen in late November. Until then, we encourage you to be looking for colleagues throughout the world who will complement your work in a session. We would like this to be a productive time for identifying collaborators. During this time, we encourage scholars to comment on the specific themes described above. You may contribute to this discussion online using the ISHPSSB bulletin board. If you would like to suggest a theme that will strengthen our multi-disciplinary and cross- session collaboration, please contact Chris Young and Mark Largent at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The deadline for paper proposals will be February 28, 2011. We hope you will be checking back regularly on the bulletin board to identify how your work may connect with other potential proposals.

Please also keep in mind the ISHPSSB policy on multiple participation: no one may present in more than one session; exceptions are made for those who organize another session, comment in another session, or give a short plenary address. Individuals may serve more than one function in a given session, e.g., chair and presenter. In addition to these roles, individuals may also present a poster in the poster session.

If you have questions about your session or paper idea, or about procedures, please contact the Program Co-Chairs, Chris Young and Mark Largent: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Chris Young, Department of Biology, PO Box 343922, Alverno College, Milwaukee, WI 53234; (414) 298-9138.

ISHPSSB would like to encourage sessions that:

a) combine more than one disciplinary perspective;

b) include participants from more than one institution and/or nation;

c) promote the interaction of junior and senior scholars, including students.

Program guidelines include:

(1) The program co-chairs, in consultation with the program committee, and consistent with site constraints, will organize a rich, diverse, and high quality program.

While it is the intention of the Society to be as inclusive as possible, the program co-chairs have the discretion to reject papers or sessions that are truly inappropriate for these meetings or that do not meet basic standards of communication. The program committee is available to assist the program co-chairs in judging borderline cases.

(2) No one may present in more than one session. An exception is made for those who organize another session, comment in another session, or give a short plenary address. Individuals may serve more than one function in a given session, e.g. chair and presenter.

(3) Each regular session must have a minimum of three presenters.

(4) Multiple sessions on a given topic should be identified with titles that distinguish the particular focus of each session, rather than merely serialize the topic.

(5) All accepted participants must pre-register for the conference in order to be included in the program.

Members of the 2011 Program Committee include:

Callebaut, Werner This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Millstein, Roberta This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Santesmases, María Jesús This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Suárez, Edna This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Stotz, Karola This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

El-Hani, Charbel This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Largent, Mark (co-chair) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Young, Chris (co-chair) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Call for Posters

ISHPSSB Program Co-Chairs Chris Young and Mark Largent hope you are already thinking about papers and sessions for the 2011 meeting in Salt Lake City.

To be sure you are getting the most up-to-date information about the meeting, subscribe to the ISHPSSB listserv by clicking on the “Listserv” link at www.ishpssb.org

This will be a dynamic setting for scholars to present their work in progress as well as expand on the implications of work completed in an interactive setting. The program co- chairs are actively soliciting posters from a wide range of scholars, providing for interaction among all participants. This setting will engage biologists, historians, sociologists, and philosophers alike. Our local arrangements team is providing a comfortable setting with refreshments readily available.

Posters are always useful in broadening the participation of scholars. We expect to see graduate students as well as experienced scholars presenting and participating in the poster sessions. A time in the program will be dedicated to the poster session. During this time, creative presentations are encouraged.

Although less common in meetings of historians and philosophers, poster sessions are a standard venue for biologists, social scientists, and educators, where scholars regularly present their work. Of special note, a poster session offers the possibility of far more time to engage in dialogue with others about one's work than a regular session does.

At ISHPSSB 2011 in Salt Lake City, scholars who are presenting a paper will also be allowed to present a poster, if proposals are submitted and accepted for both formats. In particular, posters that represent work that is in very early stages may be accepted for the meeting, and the ensuing dialogue may be most valuable to a scholar developing a new project.

As soon as the registration pages are up and running, you may submit a freestanding paper proposal. This should happen in late November. The deadline for poster proposals will be February 28, 2011. We hope you will be checking back regularly on the bulletin board to identify how your work may connect with other potential proposals.

Please also keep in mind the ISHPSSB policy on multiple participation: no one may present in more than one session; exceptions are made for those who organize another session, comment in another session, or give a short plenary address. Individuals may serve more than one function in a given session, e.g., chair and presenter. In addition to these roles, individuals may also present a poster in the poster session. If you have questions about your poster idea, or about procedures, please contact the Program Co-Chairs, Chris Young and Mark Largent: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Chris Young, Department of Biology, PO Box 343922, Alverno College, Milwaukee, WI 53234; (414) 298-9138.

Members of the 2011 Program Committee include:

Callebaut, Werner This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Millstein, Roberta This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Santesmases, María Jesús This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Suárez, Edna This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Stotz, Karola This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

El-Hani, Charbel This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Largent, Mark (co-chair) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Young, Chris (co-chair) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Call for Proposals to Host the 2013 Meeting

It is the time to start planning for the 2013 ISHPSSB meeting. The first step is to decide on a location. The Site Selection Committee invites members

who would be interested in having their institution host the meeting, to present a proposal to by February 15th 2011, or preferably sooner. Proposals should include a general description of the institutional site, availability of housing (dorms, hotels, etc) and meeting rooms (large lecture halls for plenary sessions and enough smaller classrooms for individual sessions), details of the administrative support that will be available to the conference organizers, details of any funding that the organizers will be able to raise to support the meeting, availability of transportation (both internationally and locally), and other features (local activities, scenery etc) that would make the location attractive.

Please send suggestions directly to me, Paul Griffiths, via e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or mail to Department of Philosophy and Sydney Centre for the Foundations of Science, A14, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Marjorie Grene Prize Call for Papers

ISHPSSB seeks submissions for the 2011 Marjorie Grene Prize. This prize is intended to advance the careers of younger scholars, and will be awarded to the best manuscript based on a presentation at one of the two previous ISHPSSB meetings (Exeter 2007 or Brisbane 2009) by someone who was, at the time of presentation, a graduate student.

It is very appropriate for ISHPSSB to name this prize in Marjorie Grene's honor. Not only did her work in the history and philosophy of biology exemplify the strong spirit of interdisciplinary work fundamental to ISHPSSB, but she played a central role in bringing together diverse scholars of biology even before the formation of the Society. She was a valued mentor to many members of the Society and a long-standing inspiration to all.

The award will consist of a certificate and an award of $500.

Submissions should be in the form of a paper prepared for submission to a professional journal, with an indication of the journal in question and whether the paper is already in review. Submissions can be in the form of papers already accepted for publication. Electronic submissions, in Microsoft Word or PDF format, are preferred and must be emailed no later than March 1, 2011. Hardcopy submissions must include three complete copies of the paper and be mailed no later than March 1, 2011.

The winning entry will be announced by May 1, 2011.

Please submit papers to:

Tara Abraham, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;Department of History, University of Guelph,Guelph, ONN1G 2W1CANADA.

ISHPSSB off-year Workshop Report

Trevor Pearce, Gillian Barker and Mark Borello

In a lecture at Berkeley, John Dewey (1899, 129) declared that “Philosophy may not be sacrificed to the partial and superficial clamor of that which sometimes officiously and pretentiously exhibits itself as Science. But there is a sense in which philosophy must go to school to the sciences; must have no data save such as it receives at their hands; and be hospitable to no method of inquiry or reflection not akin to those in daily use among the sciences”.

Philosophers who specialize in the ways and workings of science have frequently heeded Dewey’s advice, engaging in myriad ways with the natural, social, and historical sciences. However, too often the products of history and science become ‘mere data’ for philosophers, producing a loveless “marriage of convenience” (Kuhn 1977; Burian 1977).

For the fourth biennial ISHPSSB off- year workshop, “Integrating Complexity: Environment and History” (ICEH), we tried to recapture the spirit of Dewey’s time, when historians, philosophers, anthropologists, biologists, and psychologists together discussed the problems of life, mind, morality, development, and evolution. We chose as our main workshop theme “integrating complexity” – just as organisms are complex integrations of diverse parts, the workshop was to be a coming together of researchers from many different fields to address challenging conceptual and methodological questions. Thus, the 2010 workshop continued the ISHPSSB off-year tradition of “future directions in biology studies” by placing a bet: whatever their precise direction, such studies will tend to be more and more interdisciplinary.

The workshop was sponsored by the Joseph L. Rotman Institute for Science and Values, the Department of Philosophy, and the Department of History at the University of Western Ontario (UWO), as well as by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. It was organized, under the guidance of Gillian Barker, by a committee of faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students working in the Rotman Institute at UWO. Our fundraising enabled us to invite a wonderful lineup of plenary speakers from many disciplines: History, Anthropology, Philosophy, Psychology, Economics, and Engineering. Moreover, all participants attended interdisciplinary panels, one each day, on (1) human immunology, (2) the causes of evolution, (3) evolutionary developmental biology, and (4) historical sciences. About a third of these panelists were working biologists.

The conference kicked off with two lectures about Charles Darwin, a man who is hard to avoid at such events. Robert Richards argued that Darwin thought of natural selection as a process suffused with intention and purpose, while Frank Egerton reviewed some of the important ecological discoveries of Darwin’s famous voyage on the Beagle. Highlights of subsequent days included Emily Schultz’s historical survey of ecological and environmental anthropology; Harry Heft’s discussion of Edwin Holt, Roger Barker, and studies of organism-environment interaction in psychology; and George Smith’s demonstration that there are deep analogies between (a) the process of failure analysis in engineering and (b) the reconstruction of the past in the historical sciences. The final speaker was Elliott Sober, who argued that although it is often possible to infer whether common ancestry is more likely than separate ancestry given present traits, our information about the past is always decreasing.

As with past ISHPSSB off-year workshops, one of our primary goals was to include graduate students and other younger scholars. This was achieved by daily parallel breakout sessions, inspired by those at the 2006 off-year workshop at Indiana University – Bloomington. Speakers presented on topics ranging from Lamarck and Buffon to niche construction and model organisms, with fifteen-minute talks followed by twenty minutes of discussion. For example, Peter Gildenhuys presented a variety of extended population genetics models that are able to capture different aspects of organism- environment interaction; and Jessica Bolker drew a helpful distinction between ‘exemplary’ and ‘surrogate’ model organisms, i.e., those that exemplify a group and those that stand in for another organism.

Last but not least, we held the traditional ‘happy office hours’ each evening before dinner – this is a time in which graduate students have a chance to have a drink and converse with junior and senior faculty from a variety of institutions and disciplines. These animated discussions usually continued into dinner and beyond, facilitated by the fact that almost all workshop participants stayed on site at the Spencer Ivey Leadership Centre.

Thus the fourth biennial ISHPSSB off- year workshop was a resounding success, providing the ideal environment for a discussion of complex biological issues from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We should try to foster more such interdisciplinary events; for as Dewey (1898, 339) saw so clearly, we must not only adapt to current conditions, but also seek out and create new

conditions and possibilities: change almost always stems from the “discovery and constitution of new environments.”

You are Ishkabibble!

Roberta Millstein

One of the things that makes Ishkabibble distinctive as a Society is the extent to which it is member- driven:

• Ishkabibble has numerous committees that the general membership can serve on.

• Every conference features an all- members meeting, where members hear committee reports and vote on various proposals, including the choice of site for subsequent conferences.

• Members can organize sessions at conferences. (If you seek others with similar interests, post your ideas to the bulletin boards for the upcoming conference at http:// ishpssb.onefireplace.com/ )

• All the officers are volunteers who work without staff and without compensation; they are just members like you.

In other words, this is YOUR society. Get involved!

 [1] The proper way to pronounce "ISHPSSB."

Nominations for Officers and Council Members

Jim Griesemer

ISH Nominations Are Underway!

The Nominations Committee (Marion Blute, Richard Burian, Jean Gayon, Staffan Müller-Wille, and Betty Smocovitis, Jim Griesemer, Chair) is beginning the process of preparing a slate of candidates for election to officer and council positions in ISHPSSB. The specific positions that we will be seeking to fill are four Council positions, President-elect, Secretary, Treasurer, and the Program Chair(s). Our schedule is as follows: We will have a preliminary slate of nominees to mail out to the general membership by early March. We put this slate together by sending suggestions, with a brief explanation of why the person would be a good candidate for the position, to the committee as a whole. Once we get a preliminary slate together, in early March we will send out the preliminary slate to the general membership, asking for any additional nominations. Two members are required at this stage for any nomination to become official. The members doing the nominating will also need to secure the nominee's permission. The Nominations Committee then assembles a final ballot to be mailed (electronically) to the entire membership no more than 100 days before the next meeting. The Bylaws also state that we provide members with a minimum of 30 days to respond. If members think that more than 30 days should be allowed for voting, please let the Committee know (Jim Griesemer can be reached at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

At this point no action is required by any member. But we do want to alert you to the nominations and election schedule. Be thinking of people who might serve the Society in one of the positions listed above, and feel free to send any suggestions to members of the Nominations Committee at any time.

Travel Support Committee

Lisa Gannett

ISHPSSB supports travel to its biennial meeting for graduate students based on funding available through memberships and donations to the society. This past summer, ISHPSSB joined with HSS and several other history, philosophy, and social studies of science and technology societies in an application to NSF for travel funding for meetings held from 2011 to 2015. We expect to hear the outcome soon.

For the upcoming meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, procedures for graduate student members to apply for travel funds will be posted on the meeting web page: http:// www.ishpssb.org/meeting.html. You will need to support your application with a best-available fare quote, expected amount of institutional funding, and supporting email from your advisor. The deadline for applications is April 15, 2011.

Existing policies and procedures for student travel can be found at http:// www.ishpssb.org/operations/ travel_comm.html. Please send any recommendations for changes to one of the current committee members:

Lisa Gannett (Chair), Rachael Brown, Linnda Caporael, Berris Charnley, Don Goodman-Wilson, and Gregory Radick.

Please consider donating to the travel fund when you renew your membership, or at other times, donate via PayPal on our membership page, http://www.ishpssb.org/ membership.html, or by mailing a check to Roberta Millstein, ISHPSSB Secretary, Department of Philosophy, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616-8673, USA.

The Spring newsletter (link) contains a variety a lot of important news on recent ISHPSSB developments:

  1. President's Report
  2. Two 2016 ISHPSSB Off­year Workshops (Note: Vienna applications are due by Friday, Apr. 15)
  3. Toward the 2017 ISHPSSB Meeting (Note: conference website launched! http://ishpssb2017.abfhib.org)
  4. Call for Proposals to Host the 2019 and 2021 Meetings (Note: Replies requested by May 31, 2016)
  5. In Memoriam: William Provine
  6. In Memoriam: Eric H. Davidson
  7. Call to Organize an ISHPSSB Session at the 2016 Philosophy of Science Association Meeting
  8. Appendix: Results from a Survey of the ISHPSSB Members, by Chantelle Marlor, Michelle Riedlinger and Aaron Penner

The Fall 2015 Newsletter contains updates on the 2017 São Paulo meeting, the call for 2016 off-year workshop proposals, the president's message, and general updates about the society.

President's report, ISHPSSB 2015 Montréal, ISHPSSB 2017, election 2015 nominees, and more.

President’s Report

The death of Werner Callebaut was a shock for all of us. Gerd Müller was a close friend of Werner and collaborated with him. Müller has kindly agreed to discuss the richness and diversity of his contributions. Rachel Ankeny and other members of the Society have proposed to create a "Werner Callebaut Prize". I would have preferred succeeding Werner next July in Montreal. Unfortunately, I had to do it far earlier than anticipated.

Life has to go on. The next meeting nicely takes form. The Council and members of the different Committees will work to continue the actions that Werner initiated. It is probably the best way to honor his memory.

Michel Morange
President

In memory of Werner Callebaut (1952–2014)

This text will appear in lieu of an editorial in the upcoming issue (10/1) of Biological Theory.

Werner Callebaut
Werner Callebaut

Werner Callebaut, the Scientific Director of The KLI Institute, Professor of Philosophy, President of the ISHPSSB, Editor-in-Chief of Biological Theory, and dear colleague of innumerable members of the academic community, died in Vienna, Austria, on November 6, 2014, at the age of 62. We deplore the loss of a brilliant intellectual, a philosopher in its full meaning, and a sparkling mobilizer of ideas.

Werner was born in Mechelen, Belgium, on October 7, 1952. His early leaning towards learning and knowledge came to the fore already when, as a schoolboy, he was digging for Roman archaeological remains in his family's backyard and developed a liking for academic publications. He was notorious for getting on his teachers' nerves by "knowing too much." After visiting high school at the Koninklijk Atheneum Vilvoorde, he went on to study philosophy at Ghent University, where, in 1983, he received his PhD with a thesis entitled "Contribution to a General Theory of Rationality on Evolutionary Foundations — With an Application to the Organization of Scientific Knowledge." He subsequently pursued an academic career that led him via the Universities of Brussels, Limburg, and Ghent to Hasselt University, where he became a Professor of Philosophy in 1995. Following two visiting fellow periods at the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI), he moved to Austria and, in 1999, became the Scientific Manager and eventually the Scientific Director of the KLI while continuing a part time affiliation at Hasselt University and offering courses at the University of Vienna.

Rarely have I met anyone who understood the workings of science better than Werner did. Equally profoundly, he understood and was unflinchingly critical of the conceptual deficits in science. Werner's ambitious philosophical quest derived from an early-formed conviction that a narrowly humanities based approach to the philosophy of science needed to be overcome. While learned in classical philosophy, logic, ethics, and epistemology, it was his firm opinion that "real" philosophy of science needs to be concerned with, and based on, science. He became a role model for this attitude by extensively studying theoretical and empirical evolutionary biology, from where he derived his view that epistemological naturalism was the inevitable philosophical consequence of Darwinian theory. He fought strongly for this naturalized approach and, influenced by the work of Herbert Simon, extended it to the philosophy of economics, exploring the evolutionary study of human decision making. Furthermore, in his philosophical examinations of the theoretical content of biology, Werner used his method to address the multiple challenges from different fields of biology to the standard theory of evolution, devising a perspectivist take to handle incompatible models in scientific practice. To him, perspectives represented analyses at different levels of a system that, necessarily, can coexist at the same time but lose explanatory rigor when they are combined. Together with Ron Giere, Bas van Fraassen, and Bill Wimsatt, Werner advocated a philosophy of science according to which science cannot — as a matter of principle — transcend the human perspective. He integrated these views and applied his own version of scientific perspectivism to the conceptual issues associated with the modeling of complex, multilevel, and multiscale phenomena. He suggested that this approach could be extended to a perspectivist kind of theoretical biology.

Werner's scientific achievements are numerous indeed. With his 1993 book Taking the Naturalistic Turn he laid the foundation for another major step in the philosophy of science, following the linguistic, the Popperian, and the Kuhnian turns. In the introduction he remembers: "I was going to show the world that it could be done" — and he did. Essentially, the book combines — in a new literary form — interviews in which different scholars separately answer questions on key issues in philosophy of science, but the responses are intertwined in the form of fictitious conversations among the interviewed and with the interviewer — Werner himself. Through this new mode of presentation, it became possible to highlight an emerging tendency towards a new theory of science, one that would be substantially informed by the biological sciences instead of the traditional predominance of physics. Thus Werner's name will always be linked to a philosophy of biology that is intimately based on a naturalized epistemology.

In theoretical and evolutionary biology, Werner will be remembered as an early supporter of the extended version of evolutionary theory currently in the making, having himself contributed to it with his conceptualizations of biological modularity (together with Diego Rasskin-Gutmann) and the Organismic Systems Approach (together with Stuart Newman and myself) — much distinct from DST, by the way. Based on his observation that the classical "Modern Synthesis" never had been a “synthesis” in the true meaning of the term and, thus, had no essence, he saw the reform of this nearly a century old framework of evolutionary theory as an ongoing project, but not as the kind of iconoclasm the traditionalists shakingly fear. He argued that the current dialectical (horizontal and lateral) extensions of the Modern Synthesis theory will inevitably require major conceptual reshuffling. This, he felt, is likely to go beyond gradual "extensions of" the existing framework but, instead, will result in a pluralistic and non-reductionist Extended Synthesis that is built on many more factors than the classical Synthesis.

Lately, Werner was much concerned with the conceptual and societal consequences of “big data biology”, including the various facets of bioinformatics, systems biology, omics biology, and synthetic biology. He was not only critical of its essentially ahistorical approach but also took seriously Carl Woese’s warning that "a society that permits biology to become an engineering discipline, and that allows science to slip into the role of changing the living world without trying to understand it, is a danger to itself." He advocated rigorous opposition to such postmodern tendencies. Likewise, Werner will remain known for his contributions to Evolutionary Economics (for which he was preparing a special issue in Biological Theory) and the “bounded rationality” principle he cherished. Other themes he had focused on at various stages of his career, on all of which he left salutary marks, included reduction and emergence, limits of adaptation, the interaction of development and evolution, biological information, and evolutionary approaches to culture.

Werner's service to the community was substantial. As a university professor he loved to teach and always prepared extensive readings for his students. It was difficult for him to imagine that not everyone taking his courses was prepared to read several hundred pages by next week. In addition to his teaching, Werner served in numerous committees, both at the university and the EU level. He took seriously his role as the Editor-in-Chief of Biological Theory and served on several more editorial boards of scientific journals. An efficient facilitator, he organized and co-organized innumerable conferences, symposia, workshops, lectures, and other events. One of his favorite ones being the EASPLS summer school, which due to his initiative was held at the KLI Institute for the first time this year. He was a member of the Belgian Society for Logic and Philosophy of Science, the British Society for the Philosophy of Science, the Centre National de Recherche en Logique, the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology, and the History of Science Society.

Since 2013, Werner had acted as the president of the International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology. For him his beloved "Ishkabibble" was almost an extended family. With much excitement he was planning, during his presidency, to cope with some of the pressing issues for the society, such as its "uncontrolled growth" (due to its formidable success), which he had felt was stretching the limits of its organizational capacities. He had also planned to work on reaching a better balance of philosophers, historians, and social scientists at future meetings. And, always striving for improvement, he had meant to increase the international representation in the society, reaching out to scholars from Eastern Europe and other regions. He was greatly looking forward to the 2015 meeting at Montreal, where he had expected to announce some of his plans for future development.

Werner's contributions as the scientific director of the KLI were fundamental. He and I founded the Altenberg Seminars (a thematically structured lecture series at the University of Vienna), the Altenberg Workshops (a series of exclusive workshops on selected topics that impact the advancement of biological theory, of which more than 30 were held so far), the Vienna Series in Theoretical Biology (a book series on theory and philosophy of biology with MIT Press), and collaborative summer schools with fellow institutions — one being the above mentioned European Advanced Seminar in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences (EASPLS) (organized together with Egenis, SEMM, IHPST, IUFE, and several others) and one in EvoDevo (together with the Istituto Veneto di Science, Letttere ed Arti). But the enterprise most closely linked to Werner, the one to which he devoted all his enthusiasm and energy over the past few years, was the scientific journal devoted to the conceptual integration of evolutionary, developmental, and cognitive science. It had been his dream, since his student days, to run his “own” journal, and so he worked hard at replacing the former KLI journal Evolution & Cognition with a much broader and much more international format, Biological Theory — first working with MIT Press and later with Springer. His tireless efforts brought the journal to an unparalleled level of perfection and scientific quality.

“Scientific director” was only one of the hats Werner wore. He organized lectures, symposia, and workshops, handled the fellowship applications, sent them out for review, etc. But, at the same time, he was a fatherly figure for countless junior fellows, visitors, and students, who took everybody who came through under his wings. Everyone had to have had "Stelze and a Krügl" before leaving Vienna! There was no issue that could not be discussed with Werner, and thus, together with Eva Lackner and Isabella Sarto-Jackson, he represented the infamous KLI task force that would handle any problem, from broken laptops to broken love. What a pity that he was unable to take seat in his dedicated office in the new KLI Institute building at Klosterneuburg, for which the door plate was ready, appropriately saying "Assessore."

Werner was a cosmopolitan, both in the scientific and the cultural sense. Fluent in four languages, he easily moved between cultures and traditions in light conversation and academic discourse. He possessed an overwhelming anecdotal knowledge. Remember how he sat under Bill Wimsatt's desk? Or how a certain professor would not take any questions after his talk? Or how he had lost his backpack, his laptop, his cellphone — all through intricate circumstances that happened to coincide at different locations on this planet? He would have sold his future for a good story — maybe he did. What Salman Rushdie once said about his deceased friend Chatwick equally applies to Werner: "to be together with him meant to listen willingly." We all were willing.

Of Werner's many endearing personality traits one stood out formidably: His extremely social attitude and helpfulness, rooted in a deeply felt conviction of Egalité. This was true at all levels, whether in academic, or social, or even financial matters. He was convinced that human beings needed to assist and support each other, and he was bitterly disappointed when he discovered that the behavior of his conspecifics sometimes didn't match his standards. But that wouldn't prevent him from continuing his altruism. During his career, for instance, Werner must have written hundreds of letters of recommendation, and many of them brought success for the person he had written for. Or another example: he spent several days — and nights — helping with the copy editing of a large conference program booklet of nearly 400 abstracts last summer, although he was in no way responsible for the organization of that event. He read and corrected every single entry and, I am sure, many participants were surprised about what a nice abstract they had written — some may even have discovered the real point they were going to make in their presentation.

Werner was devoted to an intellectual life. He wanted to read, think, write, talk. Besides the massive reading load associated with his research and editorial work, he was an avid consumer of literature and newspapers. Not content with reading for himself, he read at the same time for his friends and colleagues, keeping their interests in mind. I will thoroughly miss his weekly delivery of newspaper clippings! Naturally (no pun intended), one of the themes that occupied him most was the threat to the intellectual kind of university as we knew it. We would frequently greet each other (half) jokingly with "tout est perdue" — all is lost — by which we meant the disappearance of the knowledge based university in exchange for an efficiency seeking enterprise. Despite (or maybe because of) his expertise in economics, Werner was a strong critic of the economized university model now in fashion. He loved to quote Münch's 2011 dictum: "When the scientific enterprise becomes transformed into economics, you need economics to explain the workings of science." The world Werner has left corresponds no longer with his ideal world of academic freedom, where knowledge, understanding, intellect, debate, criticism, etc. were the fundamental qualities. Certainly it was no coincidence that a 2011 symposium in his honor at Hasselt University was entitled “De toekomst van wetenschappelijke vrijheid” — “The future of academic freedom.” He confided that the depressing answer was: none.

We owe Werner a lot. His sharp wits, his encyclopedic knowledge, his critical stance, and his ever-caring attitude will be sorely missed. We will remember him standing in contemplation of a philosophical problem or an object of interest, often times — unfortunately — smoking one of his inevitable Gauloises cigarettes: the red ones, not the blue ones! Unwavering, he stood for freedom in academia, equal rights in society, and the primacy of science (for which “modularity” was a proxy). "Liberté, Egalité, Modularité" was our battle cry.

Gerd B. Müller
Chairman, Konrad Lorenz Institute (KLI)

ISHPSSB 2015 Montréal

Time to submit abstracts!

ishpssb-2015-logoThe organization of ISHPSSB 2015 is now well under way. All relevant information can be found on the conference website: ishpssb2015.uqam.ca, but let us remind a couple key dates:

  • The conference is planned from Sunday July 5th afternoon till Friday July 10th, 2015.
  • The call for abstracts is open since early October and up until January 15th, 2015.
  • And «early bird» registration will start in January 2015.

To help you with the preparation of your trip, we have listed several accommodation options, with negotiated rates. Transportation and practical information, in particular about passports and visas, can also be found on the conference website. If you need assistance with invitation letters, please let us know well in advance.

The meeting will take place in downtown Montréal. It is hosted by the University of Québec in Montréal (UQAM), which is at walking distance from the numerous restaurants and hotels of the Quartier latin. The financial district and its shopping_areas are just a few subway stations away, and so is_the old-Montréal district and its harbour by the Saint Laurent river. The campus is also conveniently_situated nearby one of the major subway nodes, the Berri-UQAM station, which is directly served by the airport shuttle-bus.

Please visit the website for more information and for regular updates. And let us know if there is anything we can do to make the meeting even better!

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Montréal!

Frédéric Bouchard and Christophe Malaterre
Chairs of the Organizing Committee

ishpssb-2015-montreal

Announcement from the Program Co-Chairs

We're very excited about the upcoming meeting in Montreal this summer and want to encourage the ISH community and beyond to get your submissions for ORGANIZED SESSIONS in early this year. Here is the link <http://ishpssb2015.uqam.ca/>. We're experimenting with rolling admissions in order to allow session organizers to select preferred day/time slots. The earlier you submit, the more likely you'll be to have your session when you like! Please take full advantage of the ISH 2015 bulletin board to make connections and organize sessions! (http://ishpssb.onefireplace.com). We're incredibly excited to announce our plenary speakers Sandra Harding and Ford Doolittle. It's going to be fantastic meeting. Get it done before the holidays!

All the best,

Rob Wilson and Mark Borrello
Program Co-Chairs, Montreal 2015

Changes in journal discounts for ISHPSSB members

Currently, when members initiate or renew an ISHPSSB membership they do so on a web platform that gives them the option of subscribing to three journals at discounted rates. Since History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences moved to Springer, all of the discounted journal subscriptions we offer our members are now connected to one publisher, presenting an opportunity to make some changes to the subscription process as well as in the options our members will have. These changes will take effect January 1 2015.First, a change in subscription process: ISHPSSB members will subscribe directly with Springer. You may do this at any time during your ISHPSSB membership. Use this link, and fill in the boxes to indicate your membership in ISHPSSB. Second, the number of journals available at discount rates has increased from three to five. After January 1, ISHPSSB members are eligible for discounts to the following journals:

  • Biology & Philosophy
  • History of Biology
  • Biological Theory
  • Acta Biotheoretica
  • History & Philosophy of the Life Sciences

The final change involves payment, which you will make directly to Springer. Each of the journals will be offered at US$ 50.00, plus tax and shipping. Depending on the journal, your local tax, and your shipping option, this may amount to an increase from our previous flat charge, which ranged from US$ 50.00 to US$ 62.00.

Laura Perini
Treasurer

Credits

This newsletter was designed and edited by David Suárez and reviewed by Maria Kronfeldner, Michel Morange and Anya Plutynski. We thank specially to Gerd Müller for his beautiful text and to all the people who worked really fast to finish their reports and announcements for the society.

The new logo of the society was generously contributed by Andrew Yang.

President’s Corner

Since this is my first address to our membership as acting president, I should first of all like to thank all of you who have supported my candidacy for their confidence. It is a real privilege to accept this challenge! My warmest thanks go also to past president Paul Griffiths, secretary Anya Plutynski, long-time treasurer Lisa Gannett, and many other friends of Ishkabibble, either visible or not so visible, whom I cannot name here, for handing over a society in perfect health, financially and otherwise. After a somewhat slow start mainly due to the necessity for the current team to familiarize ourselves with many new voices —ISHPSSB has come of age, as reflected in the existence of by now fourteen committees that in many ways assist the Council in running the society—we are ready to move further forward with full energy!

Looking back, everybody will agree that the Montpellier meeting, our largest ever, was as good as they get. Jean Gayon and Philippe Huneman, who oversaw the local organization in this most charming city, report on it in this newsletter (see “After the Montpellier 2013 Meeting”). For me personally, the most striking and beneficial innovation Montpellier brought was the engagement of many of the first-rate local biologists, in particular ecologists, in our meeting. Congratulations to Jean and Philippe as well as to Michel Morange and Thomas Pradeu, the co-chairs of the program committee, for their Herculean efforts in general, and in particular for having brought us into close contact with the Montpellier ‘biocommunity’! (I’m already harvesting benefits from this networking here in Vienna, and I suppose I’m not alone.) It would be wonderful if this accomplishment could get an encore in Montréal next year.

Looking forward, while many of us were still recovering from our intensive interactions at Montpellier, Frédéric Bouchard and Christophe Malaterre felt they had no time to lose and immediately started organizing our next meeting in “the North American city with the European heart,” Montréal, most enthusiastically. See their words of welcome in “ISHPSSB 2015. Montréal” (the conference website will soon be up). It is very practical to have Mathieu Charbonneau, a philosopher of biology from Montréal who is now a post-doc in Vienna, as a kind of liaison officer between the Old and New Worlds. The team of local organizers in Montréal is nicely complemented by Mark Borrello and Rob Wilson, who co-chair the 2015 program. From what I’ve been able to glance behind the scenes, it looks like this meeting is going to be “for-mi-da-ble” (Charles Aznavour) as well.

Future Challenges for Ishkabibble

A society that is steadily growing poses challenges that (I’d say, fortunately!) will keep us from resting on our oars. I will mention three here:

  1. Our policy, reflecting our grassroots origins, has always been to accept most paper proposals to allow a maximum of scholars, including the most junior ones, to participate actively in the society meetings. Given that both the history and the philosophy of biology are booming fields, our ‘uncontrolled growth’ (fifteen parallel sessions in Montpellier!) is now approaching, if not already stretching, the limits of our (current) organizational capacities and the infrastructural capacities (lecture rooms, dorms…) of most universities. Many of us feel it is time to reflect on what would be the best way for the society to go:
    • allow for (or even promote) yet more quantitative growth, which in practice would require shifting to a more professional level of organizing, or
    • size down in favor of more quality by imposing a more rigid selection procedure, or
    • remain more or less as we are now.
  2. The ‘HPSS’ in our name: For many years now historians of biology have been unhappy with the philosophers of biology’s ‘dominance,’ and social students of science have become ever more rare over the years. What should and can be done to reach a better balance?
  3. The ‘I’ in our name: Although, as Jean and Philippe note in their report, four continents were represented in Montpellier, there are notable geographical ‘holes’ in our covering of HPSSB worldwide (for instance, almost no participants from Eastern Europe). How can we reach out to improve this situation?

These and other issues are already being discussed in the council and relevant committees, but we hope to engage more members, as well as people who are (currently) not members, in these debates. The ISHPSSB website, which has been neglected in recent years, will soon arise in a new look, and provide functionality to stage our discussions.

Werner Callebaut ISHPSSB President, 2013-15

After the Montpellier 2013 Meeting

A word from the Organization Committee

The 2013 edition of the ISHPSSB Meeting has been held in Montpellier in July. For us, as —we hope— for the participants, it has been a great success. About 650 people came to the southern, sunny and ancient city of Montpellier, to attend a large range of symposia and talks distributed along many parallel sessions. Friendly meetings such as the welcome cocktail hosted in the Jardin des Plantes or the Banquet in the Parc du Château de Gramont gathered junior and senior researchers in beautiful and sunny settings, around provençal wines and food, and lively philosophical discussions.

Plurality and diversity have been two keywords for this meeting. Scholars came from 4 continents, with a wide proportion of young researchers. Many philosophers, but also many historians came, signalling perhaps a return of the historians in our community, which is a good thing. The very old tradition of Montpellier for medicine and life sciences may have played some role in this case. As usual, presentations in many various styles have been given, and we witnessed at the same time the dynamism and the widening of our field: the list of topics addressed in the meetings could not be given here, and the disciplines concerned cover all branches of the life and medical sciences. A fruitful interdisciplinarity has been found here with the implication of many biologists and ecologists; those who in general don’t know this conference, such as the ecologists and biologists of the Montpellier area—the most prolific concentration of ecology, biology and environmental sciences in Europe, attended talks, gave presentations and engaged into fruitful discussions with Ish members, that often are still going on. Hence the meeting entirely fulfilled its function as a great place for insemination and generation of ideas and prospects across disciplinary boundaries.

For this striking academic, social and in terms of friends success we are greatly grateful to the society’s Bureau and committee—Paul Griffiths and Anya Plutynski with whom we worked in an harmonious interaction from early on—, to our institutions—CNRS, many biology and ecology labs, Montpellier universities and others—that supported us by giving funding or lending us the conference buildings, and to Agropolis International, the Montpellier structure in environmental science that finally made this conference possible. Everybody appreciated the efficiency, helpfulness and kindness of the student staff—mostly from biology and medicine Universities—that has been hired for the event and that, on this occasion, discovered philosophy of biology, appreciated it and perhaps decided to make use of it in their future careers. But above all, our warm thanks go to all the ISHPSSB members that came to Montpellier and collectively made this beautiful event. We know that many of them enjoyed the meeting, the place and its many cultural, gastronomic, and natural attractions, and their satisfaction has been for us a tremendous gratification for the effort we put into organizing this meeting.

Thanks to all of you, and see you in Montréal in 2015!

Jean Gayon & Philippe Huneman
Chairs of the Organization Committee for ISHPSSB 2013

Report from the off-year workshop 2014

“Changing Life in Times of Crisis,” an off-year ISHPSSB workshop, was held at the Old Fire Station in Woods Hole Massachusetts, USA from May 17-21. The 16 participants came from the USA (10), Canada (3), Spain, Portugal, and Russia (1 each) and included two tenured professors, two post-docs, four independent scholars, and 8 graduate students (most of the latter with travel support from ISHPSSB). We spent four days creating spaces, interactions, support, and connections in formulating plans to extend our own projects of inquiry and engagement around "changing life in times of crisis."

This intentionally broad topic encompassed a wide range of projects: workshops in which epidemiologists would reflect on their personal and professional life course in relation to longstanding and emerging frictions or tensions in their field; development of conceptual tools to fight social injustice rooted in category-based generalizations and explanations; methods to examine the intersection of neo-liberal politics and (for one participant) regulation of biotechnology in the poorer EU countries or (for another participant) menstrual health management campaigns in various regions in the Global South; extending the philosophy of extended mind to “extended sex;” a doctoral proposal in history redesigned to connect toxic chemicals and women’s health issues since WWII as played out in the specific site of New Jersey; the science and politics of extinctions; role of public health research community in reinforcing the superiority of breast milk at the expense of ignoring inequality; an investigative video on weed scientists and invasive species; a multi-year civic science project on how different knowledge communities mobilize information to create change in the face of ocean plastics—and much more.

Activities during the workshop, as they have since 2004 at the annual New England Workshops on Science and Social Change (NewSSC)*, emphasized "connecting, probing, and reflecting" so as to support and learn from each others' inquiries, employing tools and processes such as freewriting, extended autobiographical introductions, office hours, and “five-phase” dialogue hours. (The program, with links that explain the processes used, and evaluations can be accessed via http://sicw.wikispaces.com/newssc14.) The workshop schedule, in brief, included an activity together as a group each morning and again for an hour at the end of the day. In between, time was spent in independent research related to our evolving projects, in conversations, and impromptu mini-sessions. The outcomes included: a) products that reflect our inquiries and plans, conveyed in work-in-progress presentations on the third day and revised in response to feedback so as to be shareable outside the workshop, b) experiences that motivate us to take our individual projects beyond our current scope or level of activity, and c) stock-taking towards developing the workshop format.

Comments expressed in the written and spoken evaluations include: “I now have 15 people I can turn to when I need to.” [This] “is very important work for the people involved and the tools they bring with them into their respective research and communities.” A line of inquiry opened up—“processes that produce crisis” and “heterogeneity and mutual aid” and “which philosophies deal well in practice with messy boundaries?” and how “we tend to stay safe in our areas of interest unless supported through structure an play into other spaces of inquiry.”

The participants are very grateful for the financial support of ISHPSSB, without which many of them would not have been able to attend.

Peter J. Taylor
Organizer of the off-year workshop 2014

* For further reading: Taylor, P. J., S. J. Fifield, et al. (2011). "Cultivating Collaborators: Concepts and Questions Emerging Interactively From An Evolving, Interdisciplinary Workshop." Science as Culture 20(1): 89-10

ISHPSSB 2015 Montréal

A warm welcome from the local organizers

Olympic Stadium
Olympic Stadium

We are extremely happy to welcome you all to Montréal for the next ISHPSSB meeting, July 5-10 2015.

You all know Montréal: it is a North American city with a European heart! It is a highly diverse city in all respects: linguistically, culturally, and socio-economically. It is a French city in which it is easy to get around solely in English (over half the population is bilingual). And, because of its large student body —the highest proportion of student/general population in North America— it offers many affordable eating and lodging options.

Montréal international airport is within easy reach of most destinations. Direct flight times typically range from 1 to 6 hours when coming from the US, from 6 to 8 hours when traveling from Europe, and not surprisingly longer from Asia. The city’s highly developed public transit system —voted best in North America— as well as its public bicycle sharing system “Bixi” make it a very manageable city for temporary visits.

UQÀM Campus
UQÀM Campus

The meeting will be organized at the UQÀM campus which is conveniently located downtown Montréal, at walking distance from the numerous restaurants and hotels of the Quartier latin. The UQÀM campus is also situated nearby one of the major subway nodes, the Berri-UQÀM station, which is directly served by the airport shuttle-bus. The financial district and its shopping areas are just a few subway stations away, and so is the old-Montréal district (a tourist favorite) and its harbour by the Saint Laurent river.

The practical organization of this event will be a joint effort of three local institutions: two universities with historians, philosophers and sociologists of science and, in particular, of biology (UQÀM and UdeM), and an inter-university research center that focuses on science studies (CIRST, whose members are UQÀM, UdeM and Sherbrooke University). We have already started to assemble a set of diverse options in terms of accommodations situated at walking distance from the UQÀM campus. This includes 3- and 4-star hotels with bedrooms ranging from $90 to $160 per night, as well as student residencies and studios ranging from $55 to $80.

Pavillon De Sève on UQÀM campus
Pavillon De Sève on UQÀM campus

Being located right at a main subway interchange, the conference venue makes it easy to go all over town for a quick shopping or eating trip. We hope people will focus on the meeting, but many quick diversions are within easy reach. A quick subway, bus, or bicycle ride can take you to the Museum of Fine Arts, the Contemporary Arts Museum, or maybe a quick stroll through Mount Royal Park or in Montreal Botanical Gardens (one of the largest and most diverse plant collections in the world). And if public transit is not enough, you can always hail one of the many taxis in town to get back from one of the many (many) restaurants and bars all over the city. More importantly, you can eat very well at all price ranges in Montréal.

If you wish to stay longer, you can rent a car and you’re within easy reach (60-90 minutes drive) of the Laurentians or the Eastern Townships, where green hills and mountains are peppered with lakes of all sizes. Camping, canoeing, windsurfing, hiking, fishing, or just drinking beer(s) looking at sunsets are common summer activities. But you can also decide to stay downtown and enjoy Montréal’s numerous cultural highlights, museums, concert venues and summer festivals. Whichever option you choose, we are sure you will love it here!

Frédéric Bouchard and Christophe Malaterre
Local organizers

Report from the Program Co-Chairs

In coordination with the local site organizers, we are currently finalizing both the Call for Papers and the Submission Guidelines and Participation for the 2015 meeting in Montreal. While we expect these to be available by July, we thought that the ISH membership might appreciate some heads-up, especially since there will be an important change to our acceptance policy for submissions: this year we will adopt the practice of rolling acceptances for submissions. While we may fine-tune or correct the information below in the official Call for Papers and Submission Guidelines and Participation, we do not anticipate major changes here and encourage you to start thinking about submissions early!

ISHPSSB has offered various kinds of session over the years—in length, in participatory format, in number of participants—each with their own virtues and limitations. For the 2015 meeting, we have decided to offer a single session length (90 minutes), to streamline the session types, and to offer a relatively simple rule governing the number of times a person may appear on the program. We hope that, together with a bulletin board to promote session coordination, this streamlining and simplification will encourage earlier submissions as well as a higher proportion of organized sessions.

For ISH 2015, submissions will open on 1st October, 2014 and will close on 15th January, 2015. To encourage organized session submissions, the program committee has introduced a new policy of rolling acceptances for those submissions. This will benefit those of you who would like to plan your ISHPSSB travel early, and will ensure the timely completion of the overall program for the conference. While all session types may be submitted from 1st October, 2014, only organized sessions will benefit from the rolling acceptance policy. The earlier you submit an organized session, the earlier you will hear from us about acceptance, and the more effective choice you will have as to the scheduling of your session. Please see Overview of Submission Types below for further details.

As with past meetings, ISHPSSB 2015 aims at facilitating the exchange of research ideas and results across a range of fields, while fostering informal, co-operative exchanges and on-going collaborations among a variety of international scholars. It is our goal to develop a program that will allow maximal interactions, while also giving people the chance to present their ideas to their colleagues.

Overview of Submission Types.

The three submission types this year are “Organized Session”, “Individual Paper”, and “Poster”, and are explained as follows:

  1. Organized Session: These submissions come in two formats, (a) and (b) below, and are submitted by a session organizer who must also be one of the participants in the session. Amongst other things, the session organizer will indicate 3 preferred, ranked timetable slots with the submission, and these slots will be filled on a “first come, first served” basis. Organized Sessions are the only submission type that will be given the perhaps considerable benefits of acceptance and scheduling on a rolling basis from October 2014.
    1. Standard talks session. 3 speakers, plus a Chair who can be one of the speakers but need not be. In these sessions, each speaker will have 30 minutes total (including discussion). This submission format requires a session title and abstract, titles and abstracts for each talk, as well as names, affiliations, and emails for all participants.
    2. Diverse format session. At least 2 participants, including a chair who must be one of the participants. These sessions allow a variety of formats, and may be organized as roundtables, panels, dialogues, longer talks, lightning talks, commentaries, interpretative dances, etc. This submission format requires a session title and abstract, as well as names, affiliations, and emails for all participants; further information germane to the particular format may also be included by the session organizer.
    Individuals may submit, or may participate in, up to two Organized Sessions.
  2. Individual Paper: This submission format involves submitting an individual paper that requires participant name, affiliation, email, and a title and abstract. The paper here must be no more than 20 minutes in length, with 10 minutes for discussion. Notification of acceptance will be given only after January 15th, 2015, and Individual Paper submissions will be grouped by the program chairs and scheduled into time slots that remain after Organized Sessions are scheduled. Please note that Individual Papers are likely to have a higher chance of being rejected or placed in less desirable timetable slots, as many available program slots will be taken by Organized Sessions that will be accepted on a rolling basis from October 2014. Individuals may submit only one Individual Paper.
  3. Poster: This submission format is submitted by an individual, and requires a title and abstract; posters will only be accepted after January 15th, 2015. Individuals may submit only one Poster.

Participation rule: the simple rule of two. Any individual can appear at most twice on the program (speaker, commentator, roundtable participant, poster author, etc.) in addition to serving as a session chair.

This submission structure is aimed at (i) encouraging participants to submit Organized Sessions, and (ii) to do so relatively early on; together with other requirements for submission (e.g., completion of a checklist of keywords), it also should (iii) facilitate other ISH desiderata for sessions, such as interdisciplinarity, inter-regionality, and career-stage integration. ISH has been a great place for interdisciplinary and trans-national work, as well as graduate student and junior faculty mentoring. We hope that this structure will contribute to enhancing these features of the 2015 meeting.

Mark Borrello (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) & Rob Wilson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.),
Co-Chairs of the Program Committee

A word from the Student Advisory Committee

The mission of the Student Advisory Committee is to continuously support the valuable tradition of no segregation between students and non-students as ISH is an organic blend of junior and senior scholars united by common passion for and interest in the study of the life sciences. Nevertheless, students have special needs and concerns such as lack of funding, limited networks, and career anxieties. We help maintaining the diverse and inclusive nature of ISH and enable junior network building by providing more opportunities to mingle and mix (including informal food and drink events) and by advocating for improved junior travel funding practices. We also organize training and advising workshops to address the career and publishing education needs of junior interdisciplinary HP/SS/S scholars of the life sciences.

ISHPSSB 2013 Events

Last year, the committee organized a Student Advisory Workshop “Navigating Intellectual and Professional Transitions in an Interdisciplinary World.” Sandra Mitchell chaired a panel discussion with Rachael Brown (U. of Western Ontario), Maria Kronfeldner (U. Bielefeld), Michael Weisberg (U. of Pennsylvania), Anya Plutynski (Washington U.) and Lukas Rieppel (Northwestern University). The next day, at the Graduate Student Meeting, Lynn Chiu (U. of Missouri) was elected as the new graduate representative of the ISHPSSB council and chair of the Student Advisory Committee. Current members of the committee include Emily Parke (U. of Pennsylvania), Ann-Sophie Barwich (KLI), and Nina Atanasova (U. of Cincinnati).

ISHPSSB 2015, Looking Forward

In anticipation of an inclusive and fruitful experience for students, post-docs, and new faculty, the committee will conduct a pre-ISHPSB 2015 Conference Young Scholar Survey to gather feedback and suggestions for ISHPSSB 2015. The survey will reach your mailboxes soon, stay-tuned!!

The Student Advisory Committee: Lynn Chiu, Nina Atanasova, Ann-Sophie Barwich and Emily Parke

Publication committee: open access, website re-design, editorial division of labor

The publication committee has set itself a tripartite agenda.

Open Access

A long-term and major goal of the publication committee is to develop initiatives so that the society can keep pace with the opportunities our digital world offers. Thus, we will try to find ways to support OA initiatives within the society and with journals of interest to the society. More information will be made available as soon as concrete options are on the table.

Website Re-design

The publication committee will recommend to council to decide on spending some money for a professional re-design of its webpage. That re-design shall take the new logo into account and will restructure the website according to suggestion made from the publication committee. If possible, this re-design will include a suitable open membership list to facilitate interaction among the members and to set new incentives for membership in the society, especially for younger researchers.

Editorial division of labor

The division of labor for the publications of the society (website, newsletter, listserv) shall be made more explicit. The publication committee will make a proposal to council regarding this. Part of the proposal will be to install an editorial board assisting the secretary of the society, who will nonetheless stay the ultimate arbiter for ISHPSSB content. The website editor (currently Carlos Mariscal), listserv editor (currently Trevor Pearce) and newsletter editor (currently David Suárez) will be part of that editorial board.

Maria Kronfeldner on behalf of the publication committee

ISHPSSB Council and Committees 2013-2015

Council

  • Werner Callebaut (President)
  • Anya Plutynsky (Secretary)
  • Laura Perini (Treasurer)
  • Paul Griffiths (Past President)
  • Michel Morange (President Elect)
  • Lynn Chien-Hui Chiu (Student Advisory Committee)
  • Rachel Ankeny (Grene Prize Committee)
  • Mark Borrello (Program Co-Chair)
  • Maria Kronfeldner (Publications Committee)
  • Alan Love (Membership Development Committee)
  • Emily Schultz (Membership Development Committee)
  • Akihisa Setoguchi (Off-year Workshop Committee)
  • Giuseppe Testa (Education Committee)
  • Rob Wilson (Program Co-Chair)

Executive Committee

  • Werner Callebaut (President)
  • Mark Borrello (Program Co-Chair)
  • Anya Plutynski (Secretary)
  • Laura Perini (Treasurer)
  • Michel Morange (President Elect)
  • Rob Wilson (Program Co-Chair)

Local Arrangements Committee

  • Frédéric Bouchard (Co‐Chair)
  • Christophe Malaterre (Co‐Chair)
  • Mathieu Charbonneau

Program Committee

  • Mark Borrello (Co-Chair)
  • Rob Wilson (Co-Chair)
  • Melinda Fagan
  • Tim Lewens
  • Daniel Nicholson
  • Alejandro Rosas
  • Vassiliki Smocovitis
  • Jon Umerez

Publications Committee

  • Maria Kronfeldner (Chair)
  • Richard Burian
  • Silvia Caianiello
  • Michael Dietrich
  • Colin Garvey
  • Manfred Laubichler
  • Sabina Leonelli
  • Shunkichi Matsumoto

Education Committee

  • Giuseppe Testa (Chair)
  • John Beatty
  • Christopher Dimond
  • Katherine Liu
  • Maria Strecht Almeida

Site Selection Committee

  • Michel Morange (Chair)
  • Chris Di Teresi
  • Charbel El-Hani
  • Matt Haber
  • Roger Sansom

Student Advisory Committee

  • Lynn Chien-Hui Chiu (Chair)
  • Nina Atanasova
  • Ann-Sophie Barwich
  • Emily Parke

Operations Committee

  • Michel Morange (Chair)
  • Linnda Caporael
  • Andrew Inkpen
  • Isabella Sarto-Jackson

Travel Support Committee

  • Laura Perini (Chair)
  • Rachael Brown
  • Linnda Caporael
  • Lynn Chien-Hui Chiu

Off-year Workshop Committee

  • Akihisa Setoguchi (Chair)
  • Lynn Chien-Hui Chiu
  • Karola Stotz

Membership Development Committee

  • Alan Love (Co-chair)
  • Emily Schultz (Co-chair)
  • Ingo Brigandt
  • Katherine Liu

Nominations Committee

  • Paul Griffiths (Chair)
  • John Beatty
  • Richard Burian
  • Judy Johns Schloegel
  • Lynn Nyhart
  • Edna Suárez Diaz

David Hull Prize Committee

  • TBA

Marjorie Grene Prize Committee

  • Rachel Ankeny (Chair)
  • Marion Blute
  • Jay Odenbaugh
  • Neeraja Sankaran

The Backpage

ISHPSSB Officers and Council Members 2013–2015

Werner Callebaut (President)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Laura Perini (Treasurer)This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Michel Morange (President Elect)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Rachel Ankeny (Grene Prize Committee )
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Maria Kronfeldner (Publications Committee)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Emily Schultz (Membership Development Committee)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Giuseppe Testa (Education Committee)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Anya Plutynski (Secretary)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Paul Griffiths (Past President)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lynn Chien-Hui Chiu (Student Advisory Committee)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Mark Borrello (Program Co-Chair)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Alan Love (Membership Development Committee)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Akihisa Setoguchi (Off-year Workshop Committee)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Rob Wilson (Program Co-Chair)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Are you subscribed to the ISHPSSB Listserv <ISHPSBL>?

If not, you may have missed information posted for members which became outdated by the time this Newsletter was ready. Subscribe online by following these instructions:

Send an email message to:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

with the following in the body of the message:

SUBSCRIBE ISHPSBL YourFirstName YourLastName

Check for updates online: http://www.ishpssb.org

Have you renewed your membership?

ISHPSSB members typically renew their memberships when they register for the biennial meeting. Those who do not attend a meeting sometimes fail to renew. To renew your membership, go to: http://ishpssb.onefireplace.com.

If you experience any difficulties, please contact Anya Plutynski at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

As a benefit, members receive a variety of journals at reduced rate, including ISIS and JHB.

If your membership has expired some time ago (approximately 6 months), you may be put in the “archives” of the membership database. In order to be removed from the archive, you must contact Anya Plutynski at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Credits

This newsletter was designed and edited by David Suárez. I thank Maria Kronfeldner, Anya Plutynski and Werner Callebaut for their invaluable help in reviewing the contents of this issue.

The new logo of the society was generously contributed by Andrew Yang.